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Full text of "Neighborhood analysis for Canton, North Carolina"



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NEIGHBORHOOD 
ANALYSIS 



N. C. 

Do 



CANTON, 

NORTH CAROLINA 






3 





NEIGHBORHOOD ANALYSIS 

FOR 
CANTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



PREPARED FOR: 



The Town of Canton, North Carolina 
F. E. Shull, Mayor 

Board of Aldermen 
William H. Blalock 
Frank Pressley 
Ted L. Woodruff 

Town Manager 
William G. Stamey 



PREPARED BY: 



Canton Planning Board 

George H. Trostel 

Henry Seaman 

William Savage 

Ed Duckworth 

Clinton Dixon 

E . B . Goodwin , Jr . 



TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE 
PROVIDED BY: 



N. C. DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL AND ECONOMIC RESOURCES 
James E. Harrington, Secretary 

DIVISION OF COMMUNITY ASSISTANCE 
Robert S. Ewing, Director 

LOCAL PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT SERVICES SECTION 
Billy Ray Hall, Chief 

WESTERN FIELD OFFICE 

Alan Lang, Chief Planner 

Linwood M. Harton, Jr., Planner-in-Charge 

Hermon Rector, Draftsman 

Jim Thompson, Draftsman 

Carl Ownbey, Draftsman 

Phyllis Hipps, Stenographer 

Kay Dotson, Stenographer 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PART I INTRODUCTION, PUPPOSE AND SCOPE 

Introduction 

Causes of Blight 

Delineation of Neighborhoods 
PART II HOUSING CONDITIONS 

Introduction 

External Survey 

U. S. Census Survey of Housing 

Ten Percent Survey of Blighted Housing 

New Housing Constructed 
PART III ECONOMIC CONDITIONS 

Family Income 

Value of Owner Occupied Housing and Monthly Rent 
PART IV ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS 

Fire Occurrences 

Vehicle and Pedestrian Accidents 

Unpaved Streets 

Inadequate Recreation and School Facilities 

Heavy Traffic Volumes 

Overcrowding Within Dwelling Units 

Plumbing Deficiencies 
PART V SOCIAL CONDITIONS 

Stillbirths and Infant Mortality 

Tuberculosis 



Page 

1 
3 

4 

7 

8 

11 

15 

15 

19 
19 

23 
27 
31 
35 
39 
40 
44 

47 
52 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/neighborhoodanal1975cant 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Illigitimate Births 53 

Adult Crimes Against Persons and Property 57 

Juvenile Delinquency 58 

Public Welfare 62 

School Dropouts 63 

Venereal Disease 67 

PART VI CONDITION OF NEIGHBORHOODS 

Neighborhood A 72 

Neighborhood B 74 

Neighborhood C 76 

Neighborhood D 78 

Neighborhood E 80 

Neighborhood F 82 

Neighborhood G 84 

Neighborhood H 86 

Neighborhood I 88 

Neighborhood J 90 

Neighborhood K 92 

Neighborhood L 94 

Neighborhood M 96 

PART VII SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS 

Analysis of Blight for Canton and the Planning Area 99 

Neighborhood Objectives and Goals 99 

Recommended Blight Control Program 103 

PART VIII CONCLUDING REMARKS 107 



APPENDIX - Environmental Considerations and Abstract 110 



TABLES 

Page 

1 Survey of Housing Conditions By Neighborhood 9 

2 Housing Characteristics for Canton 12 

3 New Housing Starts, 1974 16 

4 Family Income Breakdown for the Town of Canton 20 

5 Value of Owner Occupied Units 21 

6 Rental Charge (Contract Rent) 22 

7 Major Fire Occurrences, 1974 24 

8 Vehicle and Pedestrian Accidents, 1974 28 

9 Unpaved Streets - April, 1975 32 

10 Overcrowding Within Dwelling Units 43 

11 Plumbing Deficiencies 45 

12 Stillbirths and Infant Mortality, 1972-1974 51 

13 Illigitimate Births, 1972-1974 54 

14 Adult Crimes Against Persons and Property 61 

15 School Dropouts, 1974-1975 64 

16 Venereal Disease, 1972-1974 68 

17 Comparison of Neighborhoods By Selected Characteristics 109 



MAPS 

Page 

1 Neighborhood Delineation 5 

2 Major Areas of Substandard Housing 13 

3 New Housing Construction, 1974 17 

4 Major Residential Fires, 1974 25 

5 Vehicular and Pedestrian Accidents, 1974 29 

6 Unpaved Streets 33 

7 Schools and Recreation Facilities 37 

8 Average Daily Traffic Volume, 1974 41 

9 Stillbirths and Infant Mortality, 1972-1974 49 

10 Illigitimate Births, 1972-1974 55 

11 Adult Crimes, 1974 59 

12 School Dropouts, 1975 65 

13 Recorded Cases of Venereal Disease, 1972-1974 69 

14 Recommended Treatment Areas 105 



Introduction, Purpose & 
Scope 




PART 1 



Introduction, Purpose and Scope 

Virtually no city is free from blight. Blight is a problem that demands 
a concentrated and continuous effort to detect and eradicate in its embryonic 
stages or it will spread in a contagious fashion, eventually leading to deter- 
ioration of sizable residential areas. A neighborhood analysis study is de- 
signed to evaluate a community on a neighborhood basis to determine the pres- 
ence of or frequency of factors that contribute to blight. 

Blight defies any single concise definition. It is a problem much deeper 
than most people realize. Blight is deteriorating and dilapidated housing, 
broken homes, privies, illiterate fathers and mothers, hungry children, poor 
health, crime, lack of hope for the future. Blight is a complex phenomenon 
composed of social, economic and physical problems. Consequently, the eradi- 
cation of blight involves much more than the rehabilitation of substandard 
housing. It involves a rehabilitation of people as well: a rehabilitation 
that will give people hope and pride both in themselves and their community. 
"The slums are not just filthy, broken down tenements, 
garbage and trash in the streets, junk in the vacant lots and 
vermin everywhere. The slums are people — people who lead 
harried, hollow, hopeless, often desperate lives. Home of the 
illiterate, the dropout, the unwed mother, the unwanted child, 
the slum breeds, the junky, the prostitute, the alcoholic, the 
gang member, the hardened criminal. 

Until the slums are cleaned out physically and the slum 
mentality and morality are transformed, the United States will 
continue to spawn within itself the very problems which sap it 
of its resources and mock at its high ideals. 



No slum is an island unto itself. The day of the ghetto 
is over. The rest of the city and the rest of the country can 
no longer ignore it and charity is no longer enough. 

Herculean antipoverty and urban renewal efforts will be 
needed. We must provide for better educational opportunities 
and for better living conditions, and we will have to open 
channels whereby people can get out of the ghettos and slums, 
regardless of their race. 

Above all we must help the victims of slum-living to 
help themselves. Ways must be found to strengthen their 
hope and motivation, to instill in them a stronger sense of 
civic responsibility, to awaken a clearer recognition of the 
necessity of moral conduct for human progress. The urgent need 
for vastly improved environmental conditions cannot be divorced 
from the even more fundamental need for mental, moral and 
spiritual transformation. To do these things and to do them 
well, will demand the best of all concerned. To fail to do 
them or to do them poorly is to risk disaster for all concerned." 
Most people tend to identify with their own neighborhood. It is within 
this area that they live, worship, shop, play, visit friends and often work. 
Consequently, their view of the community is conditioned in large part by 
their view of the neighborhood in which they live. When people live in poor 
surroundings, they lose pride and thus have little or no motivation to better 



Editorial in Part, Christian Science Monitor, August 2, 1966, 



themselves or their neighborhood. Blight therefore becomes more intense and 
begins to spread. 

It is essential then that one's surroundings be a clean and wholesome 
place in which to live. Blighted areas do not possess these characteristics. 
Bad housing conditions and unhealthy social conditions (crime, disease, etc.) 
are related to each other as blighted conditions tend to encourage irrespon- 
sible behavior. Pleasant neighborhoods on the other hand offer a sense of 
pride, giving the residents a strong incentive for good citizenship. 

It is hoped the reader will be aware that the statistics found on the 
following pages reflect the living conditions of people. It is hoped that 
this study will focus increased attention on ways of helping those living 
in blighted areas to help themselves. 

Causes of Blight 

For the purposes of this study, the following conditions, although not 
exhaustive, represent some of the major contributors to blight: 

1. Incompatible land uses, such as a mixture of residential, industrial 
and commercial uses. 

2. Inadequate community facilities, such as absence of sidewalks, 
curbs and gutters and fire hydrants or substandard streets, water 
and sewage systems. 

3. Poor lot plotting caused by the absence of subdivision regulations 
when the land was developed. 

4. Absentee ownership of property. 

5. Absence of a minimum housing ordinance, building code, and zoning 
ordinance in prior years. 

6. Heavy traffic on narrow and poorly designed streets in residential 
areas. 



7. Racial discrimination and isolation. 

8. Apathy regarding blight. 

9. The presence of railroad lines in residential areas. 

10. Existing low levels of income. 

11. Obsolete and vacant buildings. 

12. Inadequate recreation facilities. 

13. Inadequate original construction. 

Delineation of Neighborhoods 

In most cases neighborhoods are delineated according to homogeneity with 
respect to existing physical, social and economic conditions. Where practi- 
cal neighborhood boundaries follow distinguishable geographic boundaries such 
as thoroughfares, railroads, rivers, corporate and planning limits and changes 
in zoning district boundaries. 

For the purposes of this study, Canton and its one-mile planning area 
have been divided into thirteen neighborhoods (See Map 1) ; eight inside the 
town limits and five in the one-mile planning area. Each neighborhood will 
be described according to geographic boundaries, and housing conditions.* 
In addition each neighborhood will be analyzed with respect to total blight 
and recommendations will be made for the elimination or warding off of blight 
accordingly. 



Social, economic and environmental conditions will be studied for all 
neighborhoods within Canton. Conditions in the one-mile area will be presented 
when data is readily available. 




NORTH CAROLINA 



800 1600 2400 3200 



SCALE IN FEET 




NORTH 



i 
BORHOOD DELINEATION 



DNER, DIVISION OF COMMUNITY ASSISTANCE 



7. Racial discrimination and isolation. 

8. Apathy regarding blight. 

9. The presence of railroad lines in residential areas. 

10. Existing low levels of income. 

11. Obsolete and vacant buildings. 

12. Inadequate recreation facilities. 

13. Inadequate original construction. 

Delineation of Neighborhoods 

In most cases neighborhoods are delineated according to homogeneity with 
respect to existing physical, social and economic conditions. Where practi- 
cal neighborhood boundaries follow distinguishable geographic boundaries such 
as thoroughfares, railroads, rivers, corporate and planning limits and changes 
in zoning district boundaries. 

For the purposes of this study, Canton and its one-mile planning area 
have been divided into thirteen neighborhoods (See Map 1) ; eight inside the 
town limits and five in the one-mile planning area. Each neighborhood will 
be described according to geographic boundaries, and housing conditions.* 
In addition each neighborhood will be analyzed with respect to total blight 
and recommendations will be made for the elimination or warding off of blight 
accordingly. 



''Social, economic and environmental conditions will be studied for all 
neighborhoods within Canton. Conditions in the one-mile area will be presented 
when data is readily available. 



CANTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



800 1600 2400 32 00 
SCALE IN FEET 



MAP 1 

NEIGHBORHOOD DELINEATION 



SOURCE: DNER, DIVISION OF COMMUNITY ASSISTANCE 



Housing Conditions 




PART 2 



Housing Conditions 
Introduction 

With the housing construction industry being very slow in Canton, as 
elsewhere, the lower income families are hurt the most. With very few new 
houses being built there does not exist a very significant filtering process. 
The filtering process works somewhat as follows: dwelling units become avail- 
able for occupancy through being vacated or through new housing stock. Vacated 
housing can occur either through death of the residents or through a change of 
residence. Often as a family's size and income increase it needs and can 
afford larger more expensive homes. These are usually the newer units built 
at the periphery of the city. The vacated older housing then becomes avail- 
able to the lower income families as a result of a decline in market price 
due to a lack of demand from higher income families. The implication of this 
filtering process is that if the relative price of the housing decreases more 
rapidly than the quality, then the lower income groups will be able to afford 
successively better quality housing. 

Basically there are two factors effecting the rate of filtering — the 
rate of construction of new housing and the demand, or rate of family forma- 
tion. If the rate of new housing construction is greater than the demand 
then the relative value of the older housing may decrease quite quickly. The 
depth of this filtering depends upon the range in value of the new housing 
being constructed. If most of the new housing is for the more wealthy then 
upward filtering of lower income groups will be possible with these groups 
occupying the houses previously owned by the more wealthy. On the other 
hand, with a static housing construction market the relative value of all 
housing units will not decrease and possibly will increase if there exists 
a strong demand for housing. In this situation, the quality of housing 



might decrease while the price would not. The lower income groups suffer the 
most as they are forced to occupy substandard dwellings at quite high rents. 

This condition is fairly characteristic of Canton. With practically no 
vacancy rate and no upward mobility in the housing market, it is essential 
for Canton to continue to pursue a vigorous housing code enforcement program 
both to upgrade substandard units and to prevent standard units from deterio- 
rating. Since there is practically no upward mobility for the families living 
in dilapidated housing units, it is vitally important that Canton be funded 
to build public housing for these families. Canton is fortunate in that it 
has relatively few substandard housing units that could not be upgraded to a 
standard condition. 

What small amount of new housing construction taking place is mostly out- 
side Canton in the one-mile planning area. At the present time, zoning, code 
enforcement or subdivision regulations are not enforced in this area. All 
three of these regulations are enforced inside Canton. The one-mile area con- 
tains a larger percentage of substandard houses than inside the town limits 
and it is not uncommon to find an expensive home located next to a dilapidated 
house. With a few exceptions, there is no recognizable segregation of the 
different types and conditions of housing in the one-mile area as is found in- 
side the town limits. With the planning area likely being where most new 
development will occur in the future it is important that building codes, sub- 
division regulations and zoning be enforced here either by the town or county. 
This is necessary to help prevent haphazard development which will become a 
more acute problem as this area develops. 

External Survey 

A housing survey was conducted for Canton and its one-mile planning area 
in January, 1975 (See Table 1). The survey consisted only of a "windshield 

8 











TABLE 


1 












SURVEY OF 


HOUSING CONDITIONS BY 


NEIGHBORHOOD 




















Mob 


ile 


Total 


Neighborhood 


Standard 


Deteriorated 


Dilap: 


[dated 


Homes 


D.U.s 




No. 


% 


No. 


% 


No. 


% 


No. 


% 




City 




















A 


77 


57.0 


54 


40.0 


2 


1.5 


2 


1.5 


135 


B 


154 


70.3 


61 


27.9 


2 


1.0 


2 


1.0 


219 


C 


139 


67.5 


61 


30.5 


2 


1.0 


2 


1.0 


204 


D 


197 


70.4 


59 


21.1 


14 


5.0 


10 


3.6 


280 


E 


138 


69.3 


54 


26.6 


8 


4.0 








200 


F 


194 


90.7 


15 


7.0 


1 


.5 


4 


1.9 


214 


G 


92 


68.1 


42 


31.1 








1 


.7 


135 


H 


115 


60.8 


59 


31.2 


16 


7.9 


_q 





190 


Subtotal 


1,106 


69.9 


405 


25.9 


45 


2.9 


21 


1.3 


1,577 



Fringe Area 




















I 


219 


57.5 


130 


34.1 


14 


3.7 


18 


4.7 


381 


J 


75 


66.4 


24 


21.2 


9 


8.0 


5 


4.4 


113 


K 


55 


53.9 


24 


23.5 


15 


14.7 


8 


7.8 


102 


L 


216 


52.2 


131 


31.6 


22 


5.3 


45 


10.9 


414 


M 


204 


44.9 


187 


41.2 


21_ 


5.9 


36 


7.9 


454 


Subtotal 


769 


52.5 


496 

901 


33.9 


87 
132 


5.9 
4.3 


112 
133 


7.7 
4.3 


1,464 


Total 


1,875 


61.5 


29.8 


3,041 
















SOURCE: January, 1975, Survey by DNER, Division of Community Assistance 



inspection." However, an internal inspection of housing units might in some 
cases justify placing the unit in another classification — probably a lower 
one. Houses were conditioned as either standard, deteriorating or dilapidated, 
The following criteria were used in the survey: 

1. Standard Housing: Standard housing has no defects, or only 
slight defects which normally are corrected during the course 
of regular maintenance. Examples of slight defects are: 
lack of paint, slight damage to porch or steps and small 
cracks in walls. 

2. Deteriorating Housing: Deteriorating housing needs more 
repair than is provided in the course of regular mainten- 
ance. Such housing has one or more defects that must be 
corrected if the unit is to continue to provide safe and 
adequate shelter. Examples of defects are: holes, open 
cracks, loose or missing material over small area of 
wall, foundation, floor or roof, or badly damaged steps 
or porch. 

3. Dilapidated Housing: Dilapidated housing does not pro- 
vide safe and adequate shelter; in its present condition, 
it endangers the health, safety, or well-being of its 
occupants. Such housing represents inadequate original 
construction or has one or more critical defects so 
critical or wide-spread that the structure should be 
extensively repaired, rebuilt or torn down. Examples 

of defects are: holes, open cracks, loose or missing 
materials over a large area of the foundation, walls or 
roof, and extensive damage by storm, fire or flood; sagging 

10 



roof or foundation. Such structures, in order to meet minimum 
standards, should require drastic restoration that would be econom- 
ically unfeasible and, therefore, should be demolished. 
Because of the stagnant economic and housing conditions and the relatively 
old housing stock in Canton, it is important that the town obtain the most use 
possible of existing housing units both by active code enforcement and rehabi- 
litation programs. For this reason, a conscious effort was made to classify 
substandard housing as deteriorating rather than dilapidated if it appeared 
at all feasible that the unit could be upgraded. Emphasis was placed on the 
impact of a house upon its neighborhood in terms of health hazards and property 
values rather than upon the impact of inadequate plumbing and living space on 
the family itself. 

There are very few areas of concentrated dilapidated houses in Canton. 
Substandard (deteriorating and dilapidated) houses are scattered throughout 
the town (See Map 2). It is important that Canton realize this situation. 
Once a few houses in an area deteriorate to a substandard condition, other 
houses in the area often begin to deteriorate in a contagious manner through 
lack of maintenance. Basically this occurs because deteriorating housing 
detracts from the appearance of surrounding houses. This reduces the desirability 
and consequently the value of these housing units for residential purposes. 
Sometimes these houses are rented rather than sold (often divided into several 
apartments) and quite often absentee landlords do not maintain their rental 
units well, especially in a deteriorating area. 

U. S. Census Survey of Housing 

Table 2 provides a breakdown of housing characteristics for Canton as 

compiled by the 1970 U. S. Census of Housing. Any differences between these 

figures and those compiled by the external survey can be explained by the fact 

11 



TABLE 2 
HOUSING CHARACTERISTICS FOR CANTON 



Total Percent of Total 

Housing Units 



All D.U.s 1,926 

Owner-Occupied 1,280 66.3% 

White 1,264 65.5% 

Non-White 16 .8% 

Renter-Occupied 524 27.1% 

White 519 26.9% 

Non-White 3 .2% 

Vacant 122 6.3% 

All Plumbing 1,822 94.5% 

Lacking Only Hot Water 17 .8% 

Lacking Other Plumbing 87 4.5% 

Built Before 1940 54.0% 



SOURCE: U. S. Census of Housing, 1970 



12 




MORTH CAROLINA 



800 1600 2400 3200 



SCALE IN FEET 




NORTH 



S OF SUBSTANDARD HOUSING 



'EY BY DNER, DIVISION OF COMMUNITY ASSISTANCE 



TABLE 2 
HOUSING CHARACTERISTICS FOR CANTON 



Total 



Percent of Total 
Housing Units 



All D.U.s 
Owner-Occupied 

White 

Non-White 
Renter-Occupied 

White 

Non-White 

Vacant 
All Plumbing 
Lacking Only Hot Water 
Lacking Other Plumbing 
Built Before 1940 



1,926 

1,280 

1,264 

16 

524 

519 

3 

122 

1,822 

17 

87 



66.3% 
65.5% 

.8% 
27.1% 
26.9% 

.2% 

6.3% 

94.5% 

.8% 

4.5% 

54.0% 



SOURCE: U. S. Census of Housing, 1970 



12 




CANTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



80 1600 2400 32 00 
SCALE IN FEET 



MAP 2 

MAJOR AREAS OF SUBSTANDARD HOUSING 



SOURCE: 1975 SURVEY BY DNER, DIVISION OF COMMUNITY ASSISTANCE 



that the external survey counted structures only, regardless of the number of 
individual family units within that structure. The U. S. Census of Housing 
counts each individual family unit separately. As an indication of the age 
of the housing stock in Canton, the Census figures show that fifty-four per- 
cent (54%) of the residential structures were built before 1940. This is a 
larger percentage than most towns in North Carolina the size of Canton. 

Ten Percent Survey of Blighted Housing 

A ten percent survey of internal conditions of blighted housing was con- 
ducted in May, 1975. A questionnaire was mailed to each of the blighted 
homes in Canton. The survey determined the following in each neighborhood: 
occupancy, race, number of rooms per structure, plumbing deficiencies, rent, 
family income, sex and age breakdown of occupants, and value of owner occupied 
structures. The results of this study are analyzed in succeeding parts of 
this report. 

New Housing Constructed 

Only three houses were constructed in the period of February 1, 1974 to 
February 1, 1975, within the city limits of Canton (See Map 3). New construc- 
tion did not occur in blighted or adjacent areas. This indicates in part that 
builders fear the spread of blight from existing substandard houses. 



15 



TABLE 3 
NEW HOUSING STARTS 1974 



Neighborhood 



No. Cases 



Cases Per 100 
Occupied D.U.s 



City 
A 
B 
C 
D 
E 
F 
G 
H 



Total 




457 




500 
467 





191 (average) 



SOURCE: City Building Inspector's Office 



16 




NORTH CAROLINA 



800 1600 2400 3200 



SCALE IN FEET 




NORTH 



G CONSTRUCTION - 1974 

R WITHIN CORPORATE LIMITS ONLY) 



WILDING INSPECTORS OFFICE 



TABLE 3 
NEW HOUSING STARTS 1974 






Neighborhood 



No. Cases 



Cases Per 100 
Occupied D.U.s 



City 
A 
B 
C 
D 
E 
F 
G 
H 



Total 





457 



I 

500 
,467 





191 (average) 



SOURCE: City Building Inspector's Office 



16 




CANTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



o ego itoo 2400 320 

SCALE IN FEET 



MAP 3 

NEW HOUSING CONSTRUCTION - 1974 

(INFORMATION FOR WITHIN CORPORATE LIMITS ONLY) 



SOURCE: CANTON BUILDING INSPECTORS OFFICE 



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PART 3 




s* 





Economic Conditions 

Economic factors that contribute to blight in Canton will be discussed 
in the following terms: 

1 . Family income 

2. Value of owner-occupied dwelling units 

3. Average monthly rent of renter-occupied housing 

Family Income 

Table 4 represents family income in Canton. According to the 1970 Census 
there were 153 families inside Canton that were below the poverty level. This 
accounted for ten percent (10%) of the families, which was lower than most 
towns the size of Canton. 

Value of Owner-Occupied Housing and Monthly Rent 

Table 5 provides a breakdown of the value of owner-occupied housing in 
Canton and Table 6 provides a breakdown of the cost of renter-occupied housing, 



19 



TABLE 4 
FAMILY INCOME BREAKDOWN FOR THE TOWN OF CANTON 



Family Income 
Less than $1,000 
$ 1,000 - $ 1,999 
$ 2,000 - $ 2,999 
$ 3,000 - $ 3,999 
$ 4,000 - $ 4,999 
$ 5,000 - $ 5,999 
$ 6,000 - $ 6,999 
$ 7,000 - $ 7,999 
$ 8,000 - $ 8,999 
$ 9,000 - $ 9,999 
$10,000 - $11,999 
$12,000 - $14,999 
$15,000 - $24,999 
$25,000 - $49,999 
$50,000 or more 



Total No. of Families 
23 
60 



99 

115 

145 

74 

123 

158 

118 

179 

206 

84 

12 



Median Family Income $8,095 
Per Capita Income $2,633 



SOURCE: U. S. Census of Population, 1970 



20 



TABLE 5 
VALUE OF OWNER OCCUPIED. UNITS 

Owner Occupied 1,203 

Less than $5,000 82 

$5,000 - $9,999 290 

$10,000 - $14,999 232 

$15,000 - $19,999 218 

$20,000 - $24,999 155 

$25,000 - $34,999 99 

$35,000 and over 27 

Median $13,200 



SOURCE: U. S. Census of Housing, 1970 



21 



TABLE 6 

RENTAL CHARGE (CONTRACT RENT) 

Renter Occupied 518 

Less than $30 65 

$30 - $39 90 

$40 - $59 195 

$60 - $79 88 

$80 - $99 16 

$100 - $149 6 

$150 and over 

No Cash Rent 58 

Median Rent $47 



SOURCE: U. S. Census of Housing, 1970 



22 



Environmental Conditions 







PART 4 






f^ht- 



PISGAH 

SENIOR HIM SCHOOL -^ 






Environmental Conditions 

Environmental conditions are probably the most observable indicators of 
a blighted environment. However, there are some environmental conditions that 
may be the root cause of blight but might not be readily observed until blight 
has spread. It is very important to realize therefore, that environmental con- 
ditions not only delineate the blighted areas but also indicate the areas where 
there is present blighting factors although such areas may not have reached the 
point that they are visually blighted. The following indicators of blight will 
be discussed: 

1. Fire occurrences 

2. Vehicle and pedestrian accidents 

3. Unpaved streets 

4. Inadequate recreation and school facilities 

5. Heavy traffic volumes 

6. Overcrowding within dwelling units 

7. Plumbing deficiences 

Fire Occurrences 

Fires can occur anywhere, although they are more likely to occur in 
blighted areas where more houses are likely to have faulty heating systems and 
electrical wiring. In addition an accumulation of rubbish and other combustible 
material will increase the likelihood of fire occurrences. Canton is extremely 
fortunate in that there were only two major residential fires (See Map 4) that 
occurred in the period February 1, 1974 to February 1, 1975. There were a 
number of smaller fires such as hot grease fires which did not result in sig- 
nificant damage. There were also several car and minor grass fires that 
occurred during this period. 

23 





TABLE 7 




MAJOR FIRE OCCURENCES 1974 


Neighborhood 


No. Cases 


City 




A 





B 


1 


C 





D 





E 


1 


F 





G 





H 






SOURCE: Canton Fire Department 



Cases per 100 
Occupied D.U.s 




.457 




.500 









Total 2 .119 (average) 



24 




NORTH CAROLINA 



800 1600 2400 3200 



SCALE IN FEET 




NORTH 



IDENTIAL FIRES - 1974 

OR WITHIN CORPORATE LIMITS ONLY) 



)N FIRE DEPARTMENT 



TABLE 7 

MAJOR FIRE OCCURENCES 1974 

Cases per 100 
Neighborhood No. Cases Occupied D.U.s 

City 

A 

B 1 .457 

COO 

D 

E 1 .500 

F 

GOO 

H 



SOURCE: Canton Fire Department 



Total 2 .119 (average) 



24 



CANTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



600 1600 2400 320 
SCALE IN FEET 



MAP 4 

MAJOR RESIDENTIAL FIRES - 1974 

(INFORMATION FOR WITHIN CORPORATE LIMITS ONLY) 



SOURCE: CANTON FIRE DEPARTMENT 









Vehicle and Pedestrian Accide nts 

Vehicle and pedestrian accident rates are generally higher in areas con- 
taining narrow and unpaved streets, heavy traffic volume, mixed land use and 
no sidewalks. Most accidents in Canton can be attributed primarily to care- 
lessness at signal lights in and around the Central Business District. As 
can be seen from Map 5, the overwhelming majority of accidents occurred in 
Neighborhood H along the downtown area of Park and Main Streets and along 
North Main Street in Neighborhoods C and D. These accidents cover the period 
January 1, 1974 to December 31, 1974. There is a noticeable lack of accidents 
occurring in the southeastern part of the town. This is primarily due to the 
residential nature of the streets in this area. Because of the narrowness 
and rather large amount of traffic on Academy Street, one would expect a large 
number of accidents to occur here. Surprisingly however, there were very few 
accidents reported along Academy Street. 



27 






TABLE 8 

VEHICLE AND PEDESTRIAN ACCIDENTS 

January 1, 1974 - December 31, 1974 

Accidents Per 100 

Neighborhood No. of Accidents Occupied D.U.s 

City 

A 6 4.44 

B 8 3.65 

C 16 8.00 

D 16 5.71 

E 17 8.50 

F 3 1.42 

G 6 4.44 

H 80 42.11 



SOURCE: Canton Police Department 



28 



Total 152 9.783 (average) 






i 




MORTH CAROLINA 



800 1600 2400 3200 



SCALE IN FEET 




NORTH 



PEDESTRIAN ACCIDENTS - 1974 

ITHIN CORPORATE LIMITS ONLY) 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



TABLE 8 

VEHICLE AND PEDESTRIAN ACCIDENTS 

January 1, 1974 - December 31, 1974 

Accidents Per 100 
Neighborhood No. of Accidents Occupied D.U.s 

City 

A 6 

B 8 

C 16 

D 16 

E 17 

F 3 

G 6 

H 80 



SOURCE: Canton Police Department 



4 


44 


3 


.65 


8 


.00 


5 


.71 


8 


50 


1 


42 


4 


44 


42 


11 



Total 152 9.783 (average) 



28 



CANTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



800 1600 2400 320 
SCALE IN FEET 



MAP 5 

VEHICULAR AND PEDESTRIAN ACCIDENTS - 1974 

(INFORMATION FOR WITHIN CORPORATE LIMITS ONLY) 



SOURCE: CANTON POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Unpaved Streets 

Unpaved streets contribute to blight in that they cause residents to 
lose pride and interest in their neighborhoods because of the mud, dust, 
noise and erosion that are products of such streets. There is a total of 
approximately 1*985 miles of unpaved streets inside the Canton town limits 
and approximately 20.680 miles of unpaved streets in the one-mile planning 
area. Map 6 indicates the areas of unpaved streets. Inside the town limits, 
Neighborhood D has the most unpaved streets with approximately .830 miles 
while Neighborhood G has no unpaved streets. In the planning area, Neighbor- 
hood L has the most unpaved streets with approximately 8.917 miles while 
Neighborhood K has the least amount of unpaved streets with approximately 
1.013 miles. 






31 



TABLE 9 
UNPAVED STREETS — APRIL, 1975 

Neighborhood Miles 
City 

A .182 

B .438 

C .038 

D .830 

E .167 

F .178 

G 

H .152 



Subtotal 



1.985 



Fringe 

I 3.875 

J 2.398 

K 1.013 

L 8.917 

M 4.477 



Subtotal 20.680 



SOURCE: 1975 Survey by DNER, Division of Community Assistance 



32 




NORTH CAROLINA 



800 1600 2400 3200 



SCALE IN FEET 




NORTH 



AP 6 
JNPAVED STREETS 



JY DNER, DIVISION OF COMMUNITY ASSISTANCE 



TABLE 9 

UNPAVED STREETS — APRIL, 1975 

Neighborhood Miles 
City 

A .182 

B .438 

C .038 

D .830 

E .167 

F .178 

G 

H .152 



1.985 



Subtotal 

Fringe 
I 
J 
K 
L 
M 

Subtotal 20.680 



3 


.875 


2 


.398 


1 


.013 


8 


.917 


4 


477 



SOURCE: 1975 Survey by DNER, Division of Community Assistance 



32 




CANTON, NORTH CAROLINA 




800 1600 2400 32 00 
SCALE IN FEET 



MAP 6 

UNPAVED STREETS 




SOURCE- 1975 SURVEY BY DNER, DIVISION OF COMMUNITY ASSISTANCE 



Inadequate Recreation and School Facilities 

Recreation Area : Every child needs a safe and adequate place in which to play, 
Whenever there is inadequate recreation, children often play in streets, turn 
to mischief and sometimes wind up juvenile delinquents. Although there are 
several fairly well maintained open lots around local schools and churches 
that can be used for ballgames, etc., there is only one adequately maintained 
recreation park. Canton Memorial Recreation Park is a facility that Canton 
can be very proud of. Located here are a swimming pool, bathhouse, and tennis 
courts, This area also consists of ballfields, concessions and toilet facili- 
ties. The old armory (located next to the park) will become city property 
when the new armory is built. Present plans are to use this building for 
recreation purposes. The Robertson Memorial Y.M.C.A. on Park Street also 
provides planned recreation for both indoor and outdoor activities. Missing 
from the Canton recreation program are play lots and neighborhood playgrounds. 
Small children need readily accessible play space within their neighborhood. 
West and North Canton need these types of facilities more than the other 
areas of town. These neighborhood parks should be at least five acres and 
include a ballfield, play lot, play apparatus, picnic area with shelters and 
off-street parking spaces. Play lots for small children are needed in all 
residential areas. According to the Public Improvements Budget, prepared in 
1973, at least seven one-half acre lots are needed. 

One potential recreation source available to Canton is the Pigeon River. 
In several places the banks could be landscaped and provided with picnic 
tables. Also loading and unloading ramps for small rowboats and canoes could 
be provided with certain sections of the river designated for boating. Three 
possible launching ramp sites would be the mini park on Sorrells Street, the 
area beside the Y.M.C.A. and the area around the Armory. From here people 
could boat downriver for several miles with various designated points for 

35 



pulling the boats out of the water. 

Schools : Elementary schools should be ideally located so that they are 
within one-half mile of the majority of the children served by the schools. 
There are four elementary schools, one junior high and one high school within 
Canton and its planning area. However, with the closing of Patton School, 
West Canton and the western part of the planning area are not conveniently 
located to an elementary school. Students in this area have been transferred 
to North Canton Elementary School. Map 7 indicates the location of both 
public schools and recreation facilities. In addition a one-half mile radius 
has been drawn around each public school. As the map indicates, most of the 
area within the town limits is within one-half mile of an elementary school 
with the notable exception of an area in the western part of town along and 
leading off of Fibreville-Main. In the planning area, there are several 
sections that are not conveniently located to elementary schools. This is 
especially noticeable in the populous Phillipsville section just west of the 
town limits. 



36 










MORTH CAROLINA 



800 1600 2400 3200 



SCALE IN FEET 




NORTH 



AND RECREATION FACILITIES 



PL 
radius 

ATION AREA 



BY DNER, DIVISION OF COMMUNITY ASSISTANCE 



pulling the boats out of the water. 

Schools : Elementary schools should be ideally located so that they are 
within one-half mile of the majority of the children served by the schools. 
There are four elementary schools, one junior high and one high school within 
Canton and its planning area. However, with the closing of Patton School, 
West Canton and the western part of the planning area are not conveniently 
located to an elementary school. Students in this area have been transferred 
to North Canton Elementary School. Map 7 indicates the location of both 
public schools and recreation facilities. In addition a one-half mile radius 
has been drawn around each public school. As the map indicates, most of the 
area within the town limits is within one-half mile of an elementary school 
with the notable exception of an area in the western part of town along and 
leading off of Fibreville-Main. In the planning area, there are several 
sections that are not conveniently located to elementary schools. This is 
especially noticeable in the populous Phillipsville section just west of the 
town limits. 



36 




CANTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



800 1600 2400 320 
SCALE IN FEET 



MAP 7 

SCHOOLS AND RECREATION FACILITIES 



SCHOOL 
1 mile radius 



RECREATION AREA 



SOURCE' 1975 SURVEY BY DNER, DIVISION OF COMMUNITY ASSISTANCE 



Heavy Tr af fic Volumes 

Heavy traffic volumes in residential areas are often indicative of mixed 
land uses, noise, dust, litter, and generally unsafe and unhealthy conditions, 
Several neighborhoods in Canton have streets with heavy traffic volumes. Map 
8 indicates traffic volume for an average 24-hour period in 1973 at points 
along certain streets in Canton and its planning area. The map obviously 
indicates a heavy traffic volume in the downtown area. In addition old Clyde 
Road, Pisgah Drive, Academy Street, Newfound Street and Trammel Avenue also 
have rather heavy traffic volumes. These streets are lined with mixed land 
uses consisting of businesses and residences. 



39 



Overcrowding Within Dwelling Units 

More than one person per habitable room is considered overcrowding. 
Table 10 is a summary of a ten percent survey of substandard housing in 
Canton. This survey, conducted in May, 1975, indicates that none of the 
neighborhoods, on the average, have overcrowding of substandard housing. 
Two factors that appear to contribute to this are the relatively old housing 
stock and the rather large number of retired elderly couples and widows. 
Many of the houses in Canton are the older two-story type with a large number 
of rooms. This fact together with the large number of retired couples and 
widows results in less overcrowding. 



40 




MORTH CAROLINA 



800 1600 2400 3200 



SCALE IN FEET 




NORTH 



MLY TRAFFIC VOLUME - 1974 



PARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION 



Overcrowding Within Dwelling Units 

More than one person per habitable room is considered overcrowding. 
Table 10 is a summary of a ten percent survey of substandard housing in 
Canton. This survey, conducted in May, 1975, indicates that none of the 
neighborhoods, on the average, have overcrowding of substandard housing. 
Two factors that appear to contribute to this are the relatively old housing 
stock and the rather large number of retired elderly couples and widows. 
Many of the houses in Canton are the older two-story type with a large number 
of rooms. This fact together with the large number of retired couples and 
widows results in less overcrowding. 



40 




CANTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



800 1600 2400 32 00 
SCALE IN FEET 



MAP 8 

AVERAGE DAILY TRAFFIC VOLUME - 1974 



SOURCE: N.C. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION 



TABLE 10 
OVERCROWDING WITHIN DWELLING UNITS 





Average No. 


Average 


No. 


Average No. 




Persons Per 


Persons 


Per 


Persons Per 


Neighborhood 


Household 


Household 


Room 


City 




A 


4.8 


3.0 




.63 


B 


4.5 


3.0 




.68 


C 


5.0 


3.4 




.68 


D 


5.3 


2.8 




.53 


E 


5.3 


3.0 




.57 


F 


4.3 


2.0 




.47 


G 


4.3 


2.9 




.67 


H 


5.5 


2.7 




.49 


Averages 


4.9 


2.9 




.59 



SOURCE: Ten Percent Survey of Substandard Housing by DNER, Division of 
Community Assistance, May, 1975 



43 



Plumbing Deficiencies 
According to a ten percent survey of substandard housing conducted in 
May, 19 75, Neighborhoods A, B, G and H had plumbing deficiencies in the city 
(See Table 11) . All neighborhoods had running water and flush toilets in 
each of the houses surveyed. However, not all houses in Neighborhoods A, B, 
G and H had hot running water. In addition, not all houses surveyed in 
Neighborhood H had a bathtub or shower. 



44 



TABLE 11 
PLUMBING DEFICIENCIES 





Only Cold 


Neighborhood 


Running Water 


City 




A 


8.3% 


B 


25% 


C 


0% 


D 


0% 


E 


0% 


F 


0% 


G 


11.1% 


H 


16.7% 



Flush 
Toilet 



100% 
100% 
100% 
100% 
100% 
100% 
100% 
100% 



Bathtub 
or Shower 



100% 
100% 
100% 
100% 
100% 
100% 
100% 
83.3% 



SOURCE: Ten Percent Survey of Substandard Housing by DNER, Division of 
Community Assistance, May, 1975 



45 






Social Conditions 







PART 5 



Social Conditions 
Once substandard housing, poor economic conditions and unsatisfactory 
environmental conditions have become established in a neighborhood, residents 
often become alienated from progressive or blight free neighborhoods. The 
results of this alienation are often loss of pride both in themselves and 
their neighborhood and a rebellion against society which results in loss of 
respect for the laws of both God and society. Not all of the indexes of 
blight noted below are brought about by such circumstances but often higher 
rates of occurrence in blighted areas is indicative of this philosophy. The 
following social factors will be discussed: 

1. Stillbirths and infant mortality 

2. Tuberculosis 

3. Illegitimate births 

4. Juvenile delinquency 

5. Adult crimes against persons and property 

6. Public welfare 

7. School dropouts 

8. Veneral disease 
Stillbirths and Infant Mortality 

For the purposes of this report, a stillbirth is a baby born dead and an 
infant mortality is a baby that dies when under one year of age. 

Both stillbirths and infant mortality can occur anywhere for reasons not 
associated with blight. However, the likelihood of these conditions occurring 
is increased by such factors as poor diet, low family income, unsafe and 
unhealthy environment, all of which are associated with blight. It can be 
noted from Map 9 that area M was the only area to have more than one reported 
case of stillbirth or infant mortality. It can also be noted that of the five 

47 



cases reported in the period 1972-1974 only one was inside the Canton city 
limits. It is likely that some cases were not reported. 



48 




D INFANT MORTALITY - 1972-1974 



>UNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT 



cases reported in the period 1972-1974 only one was inside the Canton city 
limits. It is likely that some cases were not reported. 



48 



B 



MAP 9 

STILL BIRTHS AND INFANT MORTALITY - 1972-1974 



SOURCE: HAYWOOD COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT 






TABLE 12 

STILLBIRTHS AND INFANT MORTALITY — 1972-1974 

Cases Per 100 

Neighborhood No. of Cases Occupied D.U.s 

City 

A 

B 2 .913 

C 

D 

E 

F 

G 

H 



Subtotal 2 
Fringe 

I 

J 1 .893 

K 

L 1 .244 

M 2 .447 



Subtotal 4 

Total 6 

SOURCE: Haywood County Health Department 



51 



Tuberculosis 

Both Canton and the one-mile planning area have been very fortunate in 
that there were no new cases of tuberculosis reported for the period January, 
1972 through December, 1974. During this period there were ten cases reported 
for Haywood County. 



52 



Illegitimate Births 

Illegitimacy is a major problem in many respects but one aspect of the 
problem that is often overlooked is the fact that illegitimacy often places 
the burden of support on the taxpayer. Consequently, it becomes a concern 
for all tax paying citizens. It should be noted that records on illegitimate 
births are somewhat less than accurate. In addition, this accuracy probably 
is inversely proportional to family income. There is probably a large 
number of cases that are never reported. A high incidence of illegitimate 
births often indicates an alienation from society which is common in blighted 
areas. Premarital sex is often a means of revolting against society which 
can be encouraged, in part, by a blighted environment. 

Most of the reported cases of illegitimacy in the period January, 1972 - 
December, 1974, were inside the Canton city limits. Neighborhoods C and E 
both had three cases reported, Neighborhoods A and B had one reported case 
each while Neighborhood M had the only case outside the city limits. Map 10 
indicates the general area of reported cases. 



53 



Neighborhood 
City 

A 

B 

C 

D 

E 

F 

G 

H 
Subtotal 
Fringe 

I 

J 

K 

L 

M 
Subtotal 

Total 



TABLE 13 
ILLIGITIMATE BIRTHS — 1972-1974 

No. of Cases 



Cases Per 100 
Occupied D.U.s 



.741 

.457 

1.500 


1.500 









.525 (average) 

.262 





.242 
.220 



145 (average) 



11 



SOURCE: Haywood County Health Department 



54 




A ATE BIRTHS - 1972-1974 



IAYWOOD COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT 





TABLE 13 






ILLIGITIMATE BIRTHS — 1972-1974 


Cases Per 100 


Neighborhood 


No. of Cases 


Occupied D.U.s 


City 






A 


1 


.741 


B 


1 


.457 


C 


3 


1.500 


D 








E 


3 


1.500 


F 








G 









H 

Subtotal 
Fringe 
I 
J 
K 
L 
M 

Subtotal 

Total 



.525 (average) 

.262 




.242 
.220 



.145 (average) 



11 



SOURCE: Haywood County Health Department 






54 



H 



B 



MAP 10 

ILLEGITIMATE BIRTHS - 1972-1974 



SOURCE: HAYWOOD COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT 



A dult Crimes Against Persons and Property 
Rebellion against society is often the root cause of crime. In turn 
this rebellion can be encouraged by a high degree of social disorganization 
which is a result of blight. Therefore, any area with a high degree of blight 
will probably be a high crime area. Also, information on these crimes was 
available only for the area inside the city limits. 

Map 11 indicates the general location of the residences of those arrested 
for adult crimes against persons or property for the period of January 1, 197A, 
through December 31, 1974. Neighborhood H has the largest number in this 
category with five. Neighborhood D has the next largest number with three. 



57 



Juvenile Delinquency 
Juvenile delinquency is another indication of alienation and defiance 
of social order which is often encouraged by blight conditions. Unfortunately 
the addresses of juvenile delinquents were not available for inspection. 



58 










AES - 1974 

FOR WITHIN CORPORATE LIMITS ONLY) 



)N POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Juvenile Delinquency 
Juvenile delinquency is another indication of alienation and defiance 
of social order which is often encouraged by blight conditions. Unfortunately 
the addresses of juvenile delinquents were not available for inspection. 



58 



B 



H° 



MAP 11 

ADULT CRIMES - 1974 

(INFORMATION FOR WITHIN CORPORATE LIMITS ONLY) 



SOURCE: CANTON POLICE DEPARTMENT 



TABLE 14 

ADULT CRIMES AGAINST PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

Cases Per 100 

Neighborhood No. of Cases Occupied D.U.s 

City 

A 

B 1 .457 

C 1 .500 

D 2 .714 

E 1 .500 

F .0 

G 1 .741 

H 4 2.105 



SOURCE: Canton Police Department 



Total 10 .627 (average) 



61 



Public Welfare 
The location of public welfare cases is often another indication of 
blight. Welfare recipients live in the lower rent areas of town which are 
generally the most blighted areas also. Unfortunately only information on 
aid to families with dependent children (AFDC) could be obtained. Also 
individual locations of recipients could not be obtained. There were 46 
AFDC cases in Canton as of March 1, 1975. This is a per capita average of 
3.4. 



62 



School Dropouts 
School dropouts occur for various reasons, some of which are not assoc- 
iated with blight, but when any large number occurs in a particular neighbor- 
hood, it may well indicate blight factors. Children may drop out of school 
because of low family income, extended sickness, early parenthood and lack 
of parental and teacher encouragement and guidance. In the Canton city limits 
Neighborhood A had by far the largest number of dropouts (See Table 15) . In 
the fringe area Neighborhood J had the highest frequency of school dropouts. 



63 



SOURCE: Haywood County Schools 



TABLE 15 

SCHOOL DROPOUTS — 1974-1975 

Dropouts Per 100 

Neighborhood Cases Occupied D. U. s 

City 

A 5 3.70 

BOO 

C 2 1 

D 

E 2 1 

F 

G 1 .74 

H 



10 1.61 (average) 
Fringe 

I 2 .54 

J 2 1.79 

K 

L 2 .49 

M 1 .22 



.76 (average) 



64 




12 
OOL DROPOUTS - 1975 



E= HAYWOOD COUNTY SCHOOLS 



SOURCE: Haywood County Schools 



t 



TABLE 15 

SCHOOL DROPOUTS — 1974-1975 

Dropouts Per 100 

Neighborhood Cases Occupied D. U. s 

City 

A 5 3.70 

BOO 

C 2 1 

D 

E 2 1 

F 

G 1 .74 

H 



10 1.61 (average) 
Fringe 

I 2 .54 

J 2 1.79 

K 

L 2 .49 

M 1 .22 



.76 (average) 



64 



B 



A 



MAP 12 

SCHOOL DROPOUTS - 1975 



SOURCE: HAYWOOD COUNTY SCHOOLS 



Venereal Disease 

Venereal disease (VD) is another indication of an unhealthy and blighted 
environment. Areas of high incidence of VD also indicate areas of social dis- 
organization which is expressed through a rebellion against accepted social 
morals, all of which are encouraged by blight conditions. 

Map 13 indicates the general areas of reported cases of VD for the 
period January, 1972 - December, 1974. Outside the city limits the greatest 
concentration of reported cases is in Neighborhood M. Inside the city limits 
the greatest concentration is in Neighborhood E. 



67 



Neighborhood 

City. 

A 
B 
C 
D 
E 
F 
G 
H 

Subtotal 
Fringe 
I 
J 
K 
L 
M 

Subtotal 

Total 



TABLE 16 
VENEREAL DISEASE — 1972 - 1974 

No. of Cases 



14 


4 

8 
10 

22 

36 



Cases Per 100 
Occupied D.U.s 



.741 

.913 

.500 

.714 

3.000 





1.053 



.865 (average) 



3.540 


1.932 
2.203 

1.535 (average) 



1 .200 (average) 



SOURCE: Haywood County Health Department 



68 




OF VENERAL DISEASE - 1972-1974 



)UNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT 



TABLE 16 

VENEREAL DISEASE — 1972 - 1974 

Cases Per 100 
Neighborhood No. of Cases Occupied D.U.s 

City 

A 1 .741 

B 2 .913 

C 1 .500 

D 2 .714 

E 6 3.000 

F 

G 

H 2 1.053 



SOURCE: Haywood County Health Department 



68 



Subtotal 14 .865 (average) 
Fringe 

I 

J 4 3.540 

K 

L 8 1.932 

M 10 2.203 



Subtotal 22 1.535 (average) 



Total 36 1.200 (average) 



H 



B 



MAP 13 

RECORDED CASES OF VENERAL DISEASE - 1972-1974 



SOURCE: HAYWOOD COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT 



Condition of Neighborhoods 







PART 6 



Condition of Neighborhood s 
This part of the study analyzes the general conditions within each 
neighborhood. The following factors are discussed in connection with each 
neighborhood. 

1. Location of the neighborhood. 

2. Land use characteristics. 

3. School and recreation facilities. 

4. General character of the neighborhood. 

5. Factors that contribute to blight. 

6. Neighborhood rank. 

7. Recommendations. 

Neighborhood ranking is explained on page 99 and Table 16 is provided 
to indicate the factors influencing rank. 



71 



Neighborhood A 

Neighborhood A is located in the northwestern part of town. It is bounded 
on the east by a north-south line just east of Carson Street, on the north by 
the railroad and on the west and north by the city limits. Heavily travelled 
streets include Main Street, Beaverdam Street and Fibreville Road. With the 
exception of the large portion occupied by Champion Paper, the neighborhood 
is totally residential. There are no schools or recreation areas in Neighbor- 
hood A, although North Canton Elementary School is within easy access. 

Neighborhood A is one of the smallest within the city limits and contains 
the largest proportion of deteriorating houses found in any of the neighbor- 
hoods. Most of these houses are concentrated in the Main Street - Fibreville 
Street area. However, all of these deteriorating houses could be upgraded to 
a standard condition. If this is done this area could become a pleasant resi- 
dential section. Except for Main Street, there are no heavily travelled 
streets and there is no commercial encroachment. It is also conveniently 
located to the Champion Paper Plant. The western part of Neighborhood A con- 
sists of standard houses and appears to be a very pleasant residential section. 
No deterioration of this section appears likely in the foreseeable future. 
Beaverdam Street needs improvement from Fibreville Road east to Cherry Street 
in Neighborhood B. This section of road is very narrow with several blind 
curves and intersections. The danger of this road is especially evident when 
a large number of school buses use the road. Also seversl sections of the 
river bank need to be cleaned up and landscaped. Visibility at the intersection 
of Carson and Beaverdam Streets should be improved. The houses located on 
Main Street and Fibreville Road from Terrace Drive north to just past Rosewood 
are in the floodway fringe of the Pigeon River. This also includes houses 
located on Pine, Balsam, Rosewood and Willow Drives. Houses located on 



72 






Fibreville Road north of Rosewood Drive are in the floodway of the river. 
Since Canton is taking part in the National Flood Insurance Program, the resi- 
dents of this flood prone area should be made aware of their opportunity to 
purchase flood insurance. Secondly, Canton should encourage these residents 
as well as others in identified flood prone areas to purchase this insurance. 
Finally, the building inspector should encourage these residents to take 
whatever steps are necessary to reduce the susceptibility of flood damage 
to these houses. 

Neighborhood A has the following factors that contribute to blight: 

1. Over twelve percent of Canton's illegitimate births. This is .741 
per 100 occupied dwelling units. 

2. Over nine percent of Canton's unpaved streets. 

3. Over forty-one percent of the houses are substandard. 

4. Fibreville Road and Main Street carry a large volume of traffic. 

5. Over seven percent of Canton's venereal disease. This is .741 per 
100 occupied dwelling units. 

6. The stark appearance of Champion International's Plant is seen 
from Fibreville Road. 

7. Lack of landscaping of Pigeon River bank along Fibreville Road and 
Thickety Road. 

Neighborhood Rank: The incorporated area neighborhoods are ranked 

from 1-8. Neighborhood A ranks 5. (One is the least blighted and 8 is 

the most blighted). 



73 



Neighborhood B 

Neighborhood B is in the northern part of town. It is bounded on the 
north by the city limits, on the east by North Main and High Streets, on the 
south by the railroad and on the west by a north-south line running just east 
of Carson Street. North Canton Elementary School is located in this area. 
Other than the school, there are no recreational facilities located in 
Neighborhood B. The heavily travelled streets include Fibreville Road and 
Beaverdam and North Main Streets. The neighborhood is mostly residential 
although the Champion Plant occupies a rather large portion in the southwestern 
corner. 

The northern part of Neighborhood B is in good condition. There are 
several relatively new houses along with older houses that appear to be kept 
up well. In this area there are no encroaching commercial areas and no 
heavily travelled through streets to detract from the residential environ- 
ment. This area is also conveniently located to North Canton Elementary 
School. General deterioration does not appear to be occurring in this area, 
although there are several houses that need repair work done. The area north 
of High Street displays a different appearance. This area contains a larger 
proportion of deteriorating houses plus two dilapidated ones. Although the 
streets do not carry a large volume of traffic, they are narrow and contain 
a number of sharp curves and blind intersections that should be improved. 
Most of the houses are on rather small lots and consequently, give the appear- 
ance of a congested environment. Unless efforts are made to upgrade deterio- 
rated housing, this area of Neighborhood B will probably continue to deteriorate 
with these conditions spreading to the standard houses. The intersection of 
Beaverdam and Cherry Streets needs improvement to increase the visibility 
especially since school buses use Beaverdam Road quite extensively. Code 



74 



enforcement should continue with special attention given to the area between 
Hill and Patton Streets. 

Neighborhood B has the following factors that contribute to blight: 

1. Almost twenty-nine percent of the houses are substandard. 

2. It contains all of the reported stillbirths and infant mortality 
cases in Canton, This is .913 per 100 occupied dwelling units. 

3. Beaverdam Road is narrow and carries a large amount of traffic. 

4. Over twelve percent of Canton's illegitimate births. This is 
,457 per 100 occupied dwelling units. 

5. Over twenty two percent of Canton's unpaved streets. 

6. Twenty percent of Canton's adult crimes against persons and 
property. This is .913 per 100 occupied dwelling units. 

7. Over fourteen percent of Canton's venereal diseases. This is 
.913 per 100 occupied dwelling units. 

Neighborhood Rank: The incorporated area neighborhoods are ranked 

from 1-8. Neighborhood B ranks 5. (One is the least blighted and 8 is 

the most blighted) . 



75 



Neighborhood C 

Neighborhood C is located in the northeastern part of town and is bounded 
on the east by the city limits, on the south by Walnut and Through Streets and 
on the west and north by the city limits. There are no schools in Neighborhood 
C although North Canton Elementary School is located just outside in Neighborhood 
B. There also are no recreation areas here, however, a large open lot is pro- 
vided by a church located at the corner of Phillips and Spruce Streets which 
could be used for recreational purposes such as ballgames. North Main and 
Newfound are the only heavily travelled streets in the neighborhood. The area 
is mostly residential although there are several commercial establishments in 
the vicinity of North Main and Newfound Streets. 

The northern part of Neighborhood C - the area along Elizabeth Street 
north of Thompson Street - contains some of the nicest houses in Canton. This 
area appears to have only recently been developed and there is new housing 
construction in this area at the present time. The area along and leading off 
of North Main Street contains a mixture of standard and deteriorating houses. 
However the general appearance of this area is not conducive to a good residen- 
tial environment. The streets are narrow and houses and yards are not kept 
up well in many cases. Consequently, unless efforts are made to upgrade the 
deteriorating houses, deterioration of standard houses will likely occur. An 
overgrown vacant lot on Lane Street should be cleaned up and landscaped. This 
will add to the general appearance of the immediate neighborhood. Other recom- 
mendations include the elimination of open storage of scrap metal and the re- 
pair of a deteriorating fence at the corner of Burnett and Trammel Streets, 
the removal of trash at the end of Sheppard Street and the cleaning of a side- 
walk and vacant lot on North Main Street between Bugg and Sheppard Streets. 
Also the foundation of a house on Newfound Street that burned still remains. 



76 



This could be a safety hazard to young children playing here and should, there- 
fore, be removed as soon as possible. 

Neighborhood C has the following factors that contribute to blight: 

1. Thirty-one point five percent (31.5%) of the houses are substandard. 

2. Over seven percent (7%) of Canton's venereal disease. This is .500 
per 100 dwelling units. 

3. Over thirty-seven percent (37%) of Canton's illegitimate births. 
This is 1.5 per 100 occupied dwelling units. 

4. Almost two percent (2%) of Canton's unpaved roads. 

5. Over ten percent (10%) of Canton's vehicle and pedestrian accidents. 
This is 8.00 per 100 occupied dwelling units. 

6. Ten percent (10%) of Canton's adult crime against persons and prop- 
erty. This is .500 per 100 occupied dwelling units. 

7. North Main and Newfound Streets are heavily travelled. 

8. Parts of the neighborhood have mixed land uses. 

9. Overgrown vacant lot appears on Lane Street 

10. Trash appears at the end of Sheppard Street. 

11. Lack of landscaping at the corner of Barr and Phillips Streets. 
Neighborhood Rank: The incorporated area neighborhoods are ranked from 

1-8. Neighborhood C ranks 8. (One is the least blighted and 8 is the most 
blighted) . 



77 



Neighborhood D 

Neighborhood D is in the eastern part of town, bounded on the south by 
Church Street, on the east by the city limits, on the north by Walnut and 
Through Streets and on the west by High and North Main Streets. There are 
several heavily travelled through streets in Neighborhood D including Church, 
Trammell, Newfound and North Main. The area is largely residential and con- 
tains no large concentrations of commercial activity. There are no schools 
in Neighborhood D and no recreational areas with the exception of some 
basketball courts in a church parking lot located at the corner of Newfound 
and Walnut Streets. 

The southern part of Neighborhood D is very deteriorated with a large 
concentration of substandard housing, many of which are occupied and dilapidated. 
The streets in this area are in very poor condition - narrow, steep grades, 
sharp curves and unpaved. This is especially true of the area along and adja- 
cent to Sharptown and Summer Streets. Most of the houses here should be 
demolished as soon as relocation housing becomes available. Several houses 
in this section do not have city sewer. The area along Trammell and North 
Main Streets consists of older housing but is generally being kept up well. 
Some of the houses in this area are in a deteriorating condition now, however, 
and unless action is taken soon to upgrade these houses, blight could begin 
to spread and initiate a general decline as a residential area. It is recom- 
mended that the accumulated junk and debris at the end of Harrison Street be 
removed. Also the area at the intersection of Oak and Church Streets and the 
railroad should be cleaned up and landscaped. Visibility at the intersection 
of Trammell, Newfound, Oak and Short Streets should be improved. Active code 
enforcement should continue in order to prevent the spread of blighting con- 
ditions, especially along Trammel and North Main Streets. The entire area 



78 



along Sharptown Road from the railroad to Newfound Street is not suited to 
residential development, Consequently, once relocation housing is available 
and the blighted houses here have been removed, other uses of this land 
should be considered. One suggestion might be the establishment of a municipal 
park which could include picnic areas and hiking trails. 

Neighborhood D has the following factors that contribute to blight: 

1. Over twenty-six percent (26%) of the houses are substandard. 

2. Ten percent (10%) of Canton's adult crimes against persons and 
property. This is .357 per 100 occupied dwelling units. 

3. Over ten percent (10%) of Canton's vehicle and pedestrian accidents. 
This is 5.71 per 100 occupied dwelling units. 

4. Over forty-one percent (41%) of Canton's unpaved streets. 

5. Over fourteen percent (14%) of Canton's venereal disease. This is 
.714 per 100 occupied dwelling units. 

6. Some of the houses do not have city sewer. 

7. Trammell and Newfound Streets carry heavy amounts of traffic. 

8. Sharptown Road and those streets leading off it are inadequate to 
carry any traffic. 

9. Lack of visibility at the corner of Newfound and Harrison Streets. 

10. Accumulation of junk and debris appears at the end of Harrison 
Street. 

Neighborhood Rank: The incorporated area neighborhoods are ranked from 

1-8. Neighborhood D ranks 2. (One is the least blighted and 8 is the most 

blighted) . 



79 



Neighborhood E 

Neighborhood E is located in the east central part of town. It is bounded 
on the east by Oak Street and the city limits, on the north by Holtzclaw Street, 
on the west by Prospect, Bailey and Hampton Streets and on the north by Newfound 
Street. Pennsylvania Avenue School is located in this neighborhood. Other than 
the school property Neighborhood E contains no recreational areas. The neighbor- 
hood contains several heavily travelled through streets including Newfound, 
Church and Academy. The area is primarily residential. Also a major residen- 
tial fire has occurred here in the past year. 

The area from Hampton east to Williams Street is in good condition and 
with normal maintenance should remain a relatively stable residential area. 
Much of the area along Academy Street south to Holtzclaw Street is becoming 
deteriorated. This blight could easily spread to the existing standard houses 
especially along heavily travelled Academy Street unless preventive action is 
taken by upgrading the existing substandard houses. The area between North- 
side, Prospect and Hillside Streets is presently in a very deteriorated con- 
dition. Some of the houses in this area are occupied and dilapidated. Con- 
sequently, this area should be a focal point for attention when Canton obtains 
approval for public housing. Several occupied, dilapidated houses in the 
Northside Street and Prospect Street area should be demolished when relocation 
housing becomes available. There are several blind intersections where visi- 
bility should be improved. Some of these include the intersections of 
Prospect and Hillside Street, Hillside and Locust Streets, Ward Street and 
Windfield Avenue, Old Asheville Road and Church Street and the rather con- 
fusing intersection of Locust, Holtzclaw and Pisgah Avenue. Code enforcement 
should continue with special attention given to the houses along Prospect, 
Hillside and Academy Streets. Academy Street is very narrow and when cars 



80 



are allowed to park along the street, especially in curves, a dangerous 
situation is created. 

Neighborhood E has the following factors that contribute to blight: 

1. Over thirty percent (30%) of the houses are substandard. 

2. Thirty-six percent (36%) of Canton's venereal disease. This is 
2.50 per 100 occupied dwelling units. 

3. Over thirty-seven percent (37%) of Canton's illegitimate births 
This is 1.50 per 100 occupied dwelling units. 

4. Over eight percent (8%) of Canton's unpaved streets. 

5. Eleven and two tenths percent (11.2%) of Canton's vehicle and 
pedestrian accidents. This is 9.50 per 100 occupied dwelling 
units. 

6. Ten percent (10%) of Canton's adult crimes against persons and 
property. This is .500 per 100 occupied dwelling units. 

7. Academy Street is narrow and heavily travelled. 

8. The intersection of Hillside and Locust Streets is dangerous. 

9. The intersection of Old Asheville Road and Church Street is 
dangerous . 

10. Overgrown vacant lot at corner of Smathers and William Streets. 

11. Lack of landscaping and poor visibility characterize the inter- 
section of Williams Street and U. S. 19-23 East. 

Neighborhood Rank: The incorporated area neighborhoods are ranked 

from 1-8. Neighborhood E ranks 7. (One is the least blighted and 8 

is the most blighted) . 



81 



Neighborhood F 

Neighborhood F is located in tbe southeastern part of town. It is 
bounded on the north by Holtzclaw Street, on the east by the city limits, 
on the south by the city limits and on the west by Pisgah Drive. There are 
no schools or recreation facilities in the neighborhood although Pisgah 
High School is within easy access. Neighborhood F is totally residential 
and contains no heavily travelled through streets. 

Because this neighborhood contains no heavily travelled streets and 
is entirely residential, mixed land use is not found, thus making it a very 
desirable neighborhood in which to live. The majority of the houses are 
standard and appear to be kept up well with nicely landscaped lawns. There 
is only one dilapidates house, which is vacant, and thirteen deteriorating 
houses all of which could be improved to a standard condition with reasonable 
effort. With improvement of the deteriorating houses this entire neighbor- 
hood should remain stable. There are several relatively expensive new houses 
located in Neighborhood F, especially in the northeastern section, indicating 
the general desirability of this area for residential purposes. The neighbor- 
hood has a quiet rural setting and is convenient to Pisgah High School. The 
vacant dilapidated house on Wesley Street should immediately be torn down. 
In addition there is open storage of junk cars, wood refuse and debris along 
Sky land Drive that should either be screened from view or removed. Also 
several abandoned junk vehicles can be seen from Rhoda Street and consequently 
should be removed. To help maintain the relative stability of this neighbor- 
hood active code enforcement should continue. 



82 



Neighborhood F has the following factors that contribute to blight: 

1. Almost seven percent of the houses are substandard. 

2. Nine percent of Canton's unpaved streets. 

3. Pisgah Drive is heavily travelled and narrow. 

4. Open storage of junk cars and other debris in several places. 
Neighborhood Rank: The incorporated area neighborhoods are ranked from 

1-8. Neighborhood F ranks 1. (One is the least blighted and 8 is the most 
blighted) . 



83 



Neighborhood G 

Neighborhood G is located in the southwestern part of town. It is 
bounded on the east by Pisgah Drive, on the south and west by the city limits 
and on the north by Pisgah Avenue. There are two schools, a ballfield and a 
recreation park including a swimming pool located in the neighborhood. Neigh- 
borhood G is almost totally residential. Heavily travelled streets in this 
area include Penland Street and Pisgah Avenue. 

The housing stock here appears to be older than in adjacent Neighborhood 
F and, with a few exceptions, is not kept up as well. There are a number of 
deteriorating housing units especially in the northern part. Many of these 
houses are to the point that continued neglect will, in all probability, 
reduce these houses to a dilapidated condition. Also these deteriorating 
conditions could easily spread to the existing standard houses if action is 
not taken to upgrade this area. Most of the houses on Vance and Valley 
Streets are in the floodway fringe area of the Pigeon River and considering 
the present deteriorating condition of most of these houses, serious consid- 
eration should be given as to whether they should be rehabilitated or removed. 
The fact that Neighborhood G is convenient to Pisgah High School should be a 
positive factor as far as residential desirability is concerned. The old 
National Guard Armory located at the corner of Penland and Pigeon Streets will 
become city property when the new armory is built on the campus of Haywood 
Technical Institute. The city has plans to use this building as a city-wide 
recreational center when it becomes available. This building is in a prime 
location and the city is urged to pursue this project with all possible speed. 
Regrading of the intersection of North and Charles Streets should be done to 
eliminate the blind intersection. Also visibility should be improved for those 
entering Pigeon Drive from Substation Road. Active code enforcement should 

84 



continue with special attention given to Valley and Vance Streets and Pisgah 
Avenue. Residents of houses along Valley, Charles and Vance Streets and Sub- 
station Road that are located in the floodway fringe areas should be informed 
of the opportunity to purchase flood insurance and should be encouraged to do 
so. In addition the building inspector should inform these residents of steps 
they could take to reduce the susceptibility of their houses to flood damage. 
The vacant lot on Pisgah Avenue between Wesley and Highland Streets could be 
developed into a neighborhood recreation park with picnic tables and play- 
ground equipment installed. 

Neighborhood G has the following factors that contribute to blight: 

1. Over thirty-one percent of the houses are substandard. 

2. Four percent of Canton's vehicle and pedestrian accidents. This is 
4.444 per 100 occupied dwelling units. 

3. Ten percent of Canton's adult crimes against persons and property. 
This is .741 per 100 occupied dwelling units. 

4. Intersection of North and Charles Street is dangerous. 

5. Penland Street and Pisgah Drive carry heavy amounts of traffic. 

6. The intersection of Shaw and North Street is difficult to negotiate. 

7. Some areas have mixed land use. 

Neighborhood Rank: The incorporated area neighborhoods are ranked from 
1-8. Neighborhood G ranks 3. (One is the least blighted and 8 is the most 
blighted) . 



85 



Neighborhood H 

Neighborhood H is located in the western part of town. Tt is bounded 
on the west by the city limits, on the north by the Southern Rail lines, on 
the east by Hampton, Bailey and Prospect Streets and on the south by Pisgah 
Avenue, Mountain Street and the city limits. There are no schools in this 
neighborhood although Pennsylvania Avenue School is adjacent to Neighborhood 
H. The YMCA is located in this area and provides various recreational activi- 
ties. This neighborhood also includes the central shopping section of town 
and consequently contains several heavily travelled through streets includ- 
ing Park, Main, Academy and Pisgah. 

There is a blighted area along Watts Street that could easily become an 
area of spreading blight going down Birch Street. Even the deteriorating 
houses on Watts Street could easily become dilapidated if improvements are 
not forthcoming. Very steep terrain is found here also. The area along 
Sorrells, Water and Main Streets has several substandard houses. Because of 
the heavy traffic and general commercial atmosphere of this area, the houses 
presently located here will likely deteriorate further in the near future. 
These houses are also located in the floodway fringe of the Pigeon River. 
Because of the existence of several dilapidated and deteriorating houses and 
heavy traffic along Pisgah Avenue, blight could easily spread to the now 
existing standard houses along Pisgah and Hillside Drives. Older houses are 
located in the Pennsylvania and Mears Avenue and Oakland and Hampton Street 
areas. These houses are kept up well and appear to be of sound construction. 
The general atmosphere of this area (no commercialism, low traffic volume, 
well kept yards, etc.) is conducive to a good residential environment. Con- 
sequently this represents one of the nicest residential areas in Canton and 
no significant deterioraton should occur in the foreseeable future. 

86 



Neighborhood H has the following factors that contribute to blight: 

1. Almost forty percent of the houses are substandard. 

2. Forty percent of Canton's adult crimes against persons and prop- 
erty. This is 2.11 per 100 occupied dwelling units. 

3. Over fifty-two percent of Canton's vehicle and pedestrian accidents. 
This is 42.11 per 100 occupied dwelling units. 

A. Almost eight percent of Canton's unpaved streets. 

5. Over twenty-one percent of Canton's venereal disease. This is 
1.58 per 100 occupied dwelling units. 

6. Some areas contain mixed land uses. 

7. Most of the streets are heavily travelled. 

8. The intersection of Church and Bridge Streets is narrow and 
dangerous. 

9. King, Vine and Watts Streets are too narrow. 

10. Several buildings in the downtown area need facelifting (See 
Community Appearance Survey and Plans for center) . 

Neighborhood Rank: The incorporated area neighborhoods are ranked from 

1-8. Neighborhood H ranks 3. (One is the least blighted and 8 is the most 

blighted) . 



87 



Neighborhood I 

Neighborhood I is located west of the city limits and extends to the one 
mile planning area. It is bounded on the east by the city limits, on the 
south by U. S. Highway 19-23, on the west by the one-mile planning boundary 
and on the north by the Pigeon River. The only educational facility located 
here is an extension of Haywood Technical Institute located just off of Clyde 
Road. Considering the geographic size and density of population of this 
neighborhood consideration should be given in future plans to the location of 
an elementary school in this area. There are no recreational facilities in 
this neighborhood. Clyde Road (S.R. 1523) and U. S. Highway 19-23 are the 
only heavily travelled streets in this area. The neighborhood is mostly resi- 
dential with some commercial establishments along Clyde Road and U. S. Highway 
19-23. 

Most of Neighborhood I is rather densely settled with a general mixture 
of standard and deteriorating houses. There are also 14 dilapidated houses 
and 18 trailers - a much larger proportion of both than was found in any of the 
neighborhoods inside the city limits. This neighborhood as a whole is in a 
more deteriorated condition than any of the neighborhoods inside the city 
limits. Several streets are unpaved . Because of the larger proportion of 
substandard housing, the scattering of mobile homes throughout the area and 
the condition of some of the streets, it is obvious that this area does not 
have zoning, subdivision regulations or code enforcement. There are a number 
of standard houses in this area. However with no code enforcement or zoning 
the area will probably deteriorate in the future. It is recommended that 
either the town or county adopt and enforce a building code program, zoning 
ordinance and subdivision regulations, with a building code program having 
top priority. In addition all unpaved streets should be paved. 



88 



Neighborhood T has the following factors that contribute to blight: 

1. Over thirl y-seven percent of the houses are substandard. 

2. Almost nineteen percent of the planning area's unpaved streets. 

3. Old Clyde Road carries a heavy amount of traffic. 

4. Mixed land use is found in several areas. 

Neighborhood Rank: The planning area neighborhoods are ranked from 
1-5. Neighborhood I ranks 2. (One is the least blighted and 5 is the 
most blighted) . 






89 



Neighborhood J 

Neighborhood J is located in the southwestern part of the planning area. 
It is bounded on the north by U. S, Highway 19-23, on the east by the city 
limits and N. C. Highway 110 and on the south and west by the one-mile plan- 
ning boundary. There are no schools or recreational facilities located in 
this area although Canton Junior High School, Pisgah High School two ball- 
fields and Canton Memorial Recreation Park are all located just inside the 
city limits and very convenient to this area. Heavily travelled through 
streets include U. S. Highway 19-23, and N. C. Highways 215 and 110. This 
neighborhood is mostly residential with some commercial activity located on 
U. S. Highway 19-23. 

Overall Neighborhood J is in the best condition of any neighborhood 
studied. The section off N. C. Highway 110 along S. R. 1903 and S. R. 1920 
contain some of the nicest houses found. This area also contains the largest 
concentration of new houses found anywhere in the Canton planning area. This 
section provides an extremely pleasant residential environment with a quiet, 
rural atmosphere yet conveniently located to the shopping area of Canton. 
This area will probably continue to develop with nice houses. The only part 
of Neighborhood J with any concentration of substandard houses is along 
S. R. 1829 and S. R. 1830. Both of these roads are unpaved with steep grades 
and sharp curves, consequently not conducive to residential development. This 
small section will probably deteriorate further in the future. Neighborhood J 
as a whole is not densely developed and appears to provide some of the best 
sites for future residential development found anywhere in the planning area. 
Commercial activity does not appear to be moving in this direction. To pro- 
tect the newer residential areas it is recommended that a zoning and building 
code program be implemented. Because of the potential for new development 



90 



here, subdivision regulations should also be adopted. S. R. 1829 and S. R. 
1830 need to be widened and paved. 

Neighborhood J has the following factors that contribute to blight: 

1. Almost thirty percent of the houses are substandard. 

2. Almost twelve percent of the planning area's unpaved streets. 

3. Twenty-five percent of the planning area's stillbirths and infant 
mortality. This is .893 per 100 occupied dwelling units. 

4. Ten percent of the planning area's venereal disease. This is .893 
per 100 occupied dwelling units. 

5. There are areas of mixed land use in Neighborhood J. 

6. S. R. 1829 and S. R. 1830 are narrow and not adequate, 

7. U. S. Highway 19-23 is heavily travelled. 

Neighborhood Rank: The planning area neighborhoods are ranked from 
1-5. Neighborhood J is ranked 3. (One is the least blighted and 5 is 
the most blighted) . 



91 



Neighborhood K 

Neighborhood K is located in the northwestern part of the planning area. 
It is bounded on the east by N. C. Highway 215 and S. R. 1582, on the south 
by the Pigeon River and on the west and north by the one-mile planning boundary. 
Neighborhood K contains no schools or recreational facilities. N. C. Highway 
215 and Interstate 40 are the only heavily travelled roads in the area. Most 
of the developed land is devoted to residential purposes with only a few 
commercial sites. 

Neighborhood K contains some of the real extremes in housing conditions. 
Some of the worst and best housing is found in this area. Neighborhood K con- 
tains the largest percentage of dilapidated houses (almost 15%) of any 
neighborhood studied. There is a concentration of several dilapidated houses 
on Thickety Road (N. C. 215) in the vicinity of S. R. 1553. The sections 
along S. R. 1550 contain mostly dilapidated and deteriorating houses and 
the section will probably deteriorate further in the future. The largest 
concentration of standard houses is in the vicinity where S. R. 1550 and 
S. R. 1551 split. This is a nice section where the houses appear to be kept 
up fairly well. There are also several trailers in Neighborhood K although 
no large concentrations and most appear to be kept up well. Zoning, subdivi- 
sion regulations and building codes need to be enforced in this neighborhood. 
Also, when relocation housing becomes available, those residents of dilapidated 
houses in the area where S. R. 1553 and N. C. Highway 215 intersect should be 
given high priority so those houses can be demolished. 



92 



Neighborhood K has the following factors that contribute to blight: 

1. Over thirty-eight percent of the houses are substandard. 

2. Almost five percent of the planning area's unpaved roads. 

3. N. C. Highway 215 carries a heavy amount of traffic. 

4. Mixed land use occurs in some parts. 

5. State Road 1553 is narrow and inadequate to serve as a residential 
street . 

Neighborhood Rank: The planning area neighborhoods are ranked from 1-5 

Neighborhood K is ranked 1. (One is the least blighted and 5 is the most 

blighted) , 



93 



Neighborhood L 

Neighborhood L is located in the northeastern part of the planning area. 
It is bounded on the north and east by the one-mile planning boundary, on 
the south by the city limits and U. S. Highway 19-23 and on the west by N. C. 
Highway 215. Heavily travelled roads include N. C. Highway 23. 5, S. R, 1589 
(North Canton Road), S. R. 1585 and U. S. Highway 19-23. Beaverdam Elementary 
School is located in this neighborhood. Except for the school site there are 
no recreational facilities in Neighborhood L. Most of the land is devoted to 
residential purposes or is vacant. 

Neighborhood L contains a general mixture of standard, deteriorating and 
dilapidated houses and trailers. Over ten percent of the structures are 
trailers. This is the largest percentage of trailers found in any of the 
neighborhoods studied. The area along Thickety Road, North Canton Road and 
S. R. 1585 is very densely settled and is in a generally deteriorated condi- 
tion. In this area, there are several dilapidated houses and approximately 
half of the other houses along these roads are deteriorating. There is also 
a scattering of trailers in this area. This part of Neighborhood L will pro- 
bably deteriorate further in the future because the overall appearance is not 
conducive to a good residential environment. However an active building code 
enforcement program could prevent this deterioration from occurring. The 
section off Hill Top Road is extremely nice. All of the yards are well land- 
scaped and most of the houses appear relatively new and well maintained. The 
area has a rural setting and a very pleasant residential environment. No 
deterioration should occur in this section in the foreseeable future. In addi- 
tion to building codes, zoning and subdivision regulations should be enforced 
in this area. 



94 



Neighborhood L has the following factors that contribute to blight: 

1. Thirty-seven percent of the houses are substandard. 

2. Over forty-three percent of the planning area's unpaved streets. 

3. Twenty-five percent of the planning area's stillbirths and infant 
mortality. This is .244 per 100 occupied dwelling units. 

4. Fifty percent of the planning area's illegitimate births. This is 
.244 per 100 occupied dwelling units. 

5. Twenty percent of the planning area's venereal disease. This is 
.488 per 100 occupied dwelling units. 

6. Mixed land use occurs in some parts of this neighborhood. 

7. North Canton Road and State Road 1585 are both heavily travelled. 
Neighborhood Rank: The planning area neighborhoods are ranked from 

1-5. Neighborhood L is ranked 4. (One is the least blighted and 5 is the 
most blighted) . 



95 



Neighborhood M 

Neighborhood M is located in the southeastern part of the planning area. 
It is bounded on the east and south by the one-mile planning boundary, on the 
west by N. C. Highway 110 and the city limits and on the north by the city 
limits and U. S. Highway 19-23. Morning Star Elementary School is located in 
this neighborhood. Except for the school grounds there are no recreational 
facilities located in this neighborhood. Heavily travelled roads include U. S. 
Highway 19-23, S. R. 1854 (Dutch Cove Road) and N. C. Highway 110. Most of the 
land is devoted to residential purposes or is vacant. 

Neighborhood M has the smallest percentage of standard units and the 
largest percentage of deteriorating units. It is also the largest neighborhood 
both in terms of geographic size and total number of housing units. There is 
a rather large, dense concentration of substandard houses near the city land- 
fill along and leading off of Dutch Cove Road- This section is where most of 
the Blacks in the planning area are concentrated. The streets in this section 
are narrow and in generally poor repair. This whole section is in a very deter- 
iorated condition and, considering the large number of dilapidated houses (8), 
a program of demolition and renewal should be initiated rather than attempting 
to rehabilitate existing units. Residents of this section should have high 
priority when relocation housing becomes available. The entire area along Dutch 
Cove Road from the city limits southeast to Morning Star School is densely 
developed with a mixture of housing conditions but in general is in a deterio- 
rating condition. Most substandard units along this road could be rehabilitated. 
However unless this is done this section will probably deteriorate further with 
blight spreading to present standard units. The rest of Neighborhood M is not 
as densely settled and there are no concentrations of blight but rather a gen- 
eral scattering of all types of units including a rather large number of mobile 



96 



homes. Zoning, subdivision regulations and a building code program should be 
enforced in Neighhorhood M. Top priority should be given to implementing a 
building code compliance program. There are several vacant dilapidated houses 
on Dutch Cove Road that should be demolished immediately. 

Neighborhood M has the following factors that contribute to blight: 

1. Over forty-six percent of the houses are substandard. 

2. Seventy percent of the planning area's venereal disease. This is 
1.566 per 100 occupied dwelling units. 

3. Fifty percent of the planning area's illegitimate births. This is 
.224 per 100 occupied dwelling units. 

4. Fifty percent of the planning area's stillbirths and infant mortality, 
This is .447 per 100 occupied dwelling units. 

5. Almost twenty-two percent of the planning area's unpaved streets. 

6. Mixed land use occurs in several places. 

7. Dutch Cove Road (S. R. 1854) is heavily travelled. 

8. The city landfill is located near residential structures. 

9. N. C. Highway 110 (entrance to town) contains several litter areas, 
overgrown creek banks and deteriorated houses. 

Neighborhood Rank: The planning area neighborhoods are ranked from 

1-5. Neightobhood M. is ranked 5. (One is the least blighted and 5 is the 

most blighted) . 



97 



Summary and 
Recommendations 




PART 7 






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Summary and Recommendations 
Analysis of Blight for Canton and the Planning Area 
The preceding sections have indicated the degree of each blight factor 
in regard to each neighborhood. Although neighborhood rank has been mentioned, 
it has not been explained. Table 16, which succeeds this section, is a com- 
parison of neighborhoods by selected characteristics. Most of the blight 
factors in Canton are indicated in this table and each neighborhood is ranked 
according to its degree of blight with respect to that factor when compared to 
the other neighborhoods. To determine the overall rank of any neighborhood 
one merely adds the ranks for each blight factor from substandard housing on 
the left to school dropouts on the right. A rank of one is best and a rank 
of eight is worst for the city neighborhoods and a rank of five is worst for 
the fringe neighborhoods. (The incorporated area neighborhoods are ranked 
separately from the fringe area for purposes of comparison) . 
Neighborhood Objectives and Goals 

Although blight in Canton is not as evident as in many other towns of the 
same general size, some of the consequences of blight do plague the town and 
its planning area. It is important that the town act now in order to control 
and eliminate blighting factors before they spread. There is no easy method, 
no set formula by which a city can begin such a difficult task. Following 
are some suggested goals and objectives that might be utilized in Canton. 
Housing 

1. Home maintenance should be improved. Deteriorated housing could 

be improved through painting or repairs to roof, chimneys, windows, 
doors, steps, porches, floors, walls and other such items. 

2. Dilapidated housing should be removed when vacated. Strict code 
enforcement in many cities has worked favorably in this respect. 

3. Vacant dilapidated nonresidential buildings not in use should be 

removed . 

99 



4. The recently formed Canton Beautif ication Commission should be 

encouraged and supported in its efforts to concentrate on beautifi- 
cation campaigns, gardening projects, removal of junk automobiles 
and other such clean-up projects. The active participation of area 
residents in any clean-up projects should be encouraged. This 
would help create a justifiable sense of pride from the act of 
participating in the completion of such projects. 
Economic 

1. Encourage hiring of the handicapped in order to raise family incomes 

2. Encourage education as a means of upgrading salary levels and fos- 
tering a sense of pride in one's self. 

3. Encourage high quality industry to locate in and near Canton so 
that more job opportunities can be available and the town can begin 
to diversify its economy. 

4. Continue the attempt to obtain funding for public housing for 
families that cannot afford standard housing. 

5. To foster a sense of pride which would result in better maintenance, 
families should be encouraged to buy homes rather than rent. 

6. Make use of Federal funds to educate and to train the unemployed 
or underemployed and physically handicapped persons for better 
jobs. A possible source for Federal funding is the Department of 
Health, Education and Welfare, Office of Education. Possible pro- 
grams include the Economic Opportunity Act of 1965, Vocational 
Education Amendment of 1968, Elementary and Secondary Education 
Act of 1965 and Cooperative Research Act. Additional and more 
specific information can be obtained from the regional office of 
HEW at: 50 Seventh Street, N.E., Room 404, Atlanta, Georgia 30323. 



As more skilled workers are available, it will be easier to attract 
industrial plants that provide higher paying jobs. 

7. Citizens should be encouraged to make use of Haywood Technical 
Institute to improve their vocational abilities. This should be 
viewed as a viable alternative to a four year college education. 

8. Interested citizens should be encouraged to seek small loans from 
the Federal government in order to help finance small businesses. 

Environmental 

1. Adopt and enforce codes and ordinances such as zoning ordinances, 
subdivision regulations, building codes and housing codes in the 
planning areas. Continue the active enforcement of these codes 
and ordinances within the town limits. 

2. Landscape public areas and encourage garden clubs to landscape 
vacant areas wherever possible. 

3. Keep vacant lots free from weeds and trash. 

4. Remove all old junk cars from residential areas. 

5. Pave all streets within the corporate limits. This should include 
curb and gutters for adequate drainage. 

6. Sidewalks should be provided in areas of heavy pedestrian traffic. 

7. Elimination of residential nuisances such as noise and odor result- 
ing from mixed land use in residential areas should be encouraged 
through the zoning ordinance. 

8. Provide small recreation areas to serve the people in all neighbor- 
hoods. 

9. To the extent possible, heavy traffic volume should be diverted from 
residential streets. 

10. Adequate lighting should be provided along all residential streets 
in the corporate limits. 



101 



11. Buffers and parks should be provided to divide residential land use 
from commercial or industrial land use. 
S ocial 

1. Control the advent and spread of disease through education campaigns, 

2. Special grants should be obtained from the U. S. Public Health Ser- 
vice to provide for intensive community vaccination efforts and 
research work in communicable diseases, tuberculosis control and 
venereal disease. 



102 



Rec ommended Blight Control Program 
It is not difficult to pinpoint most blighted areas in Canton. This 
study is intended to not only point out blighted areas but to indicate 
blighting factors so that more meaningful recommendations can be made for 
the elimination of blight. All blighting factors indicated should be con- 
sidered in steps to eliminate blight. The degree of blighting factors present 
in each neighborhood is the basis on which proposed treatment areas are 
designated. There are three types of renewal treatment. 

Conservation - Conservation is the method utilized for protecting 
neighborhoods that are not seriously blighted. Conservation action 
requires cooperation between local government officials and resi- 
dents living in such areas. The aim of conservation action is to 
preserve and maintain the pleasing qualities of a neighborhood. 
Such preservation includes minor repairs, painting and landscaping. 
Some of the tools of conservation are local codes and ordinances 
and clean-up campaigns. Occasionally, rehabilitation is needed in 
a conservation area. Since conservation action checks blight 
before it begins, its importance to a city cannot be overstressed . 
R ehabilitatio n - Rehabilitation action is the primary method for 
revising an area that has begun to deteriorate. Often such neighbor- 
hoods have code violations and abundant substandard housing. It is 
only feasible to rehabilitate when such rehabilitation is cheaper 
or more practical than total clearance and reconstruction. Rehabili- 
tation may involve demolition of parts of a neighborhood or it may 
involve public improvements such as street changes, water and sewer 
extensions and park additions. 



103 



Redevelopment - Redevelopment action is the last alternative to 
urban renewal. It is undertaken only when neighborhoods have 
reached a point of decay whereby it would be unrealistic to try 
to repair or revive them. Generally, such neighborhoods have 
mostly substandard housing, poor street design and high incidence 
of both social and environmental blight factors. Treatment of 
such areas consists of acquiring and removing all substandard 
structures and replotting the area. The reuse of redevelopment 
areas may be for any type use or even any combination of uses 
that fits the city's land development plan. A program of 
clearance of blighted housing to be effective must provide for 
the relocation of the inhabitants in suitable standard housing. 
The Recommended Treatment Areas Map is presented in a general 
way. It should be followed up by more detailed surveys and 
analyses in these areas where problems are sorted out and in 
those areas recommended for redevelopment . 



104 







MORTH CAROLINA 



800 1600 2400 3200 



SCALE IN FEET 




NORTH 



NDED TREATMENT AREAS 



ERVATION 
BILITATION 
ELOPMENT 



Redev elopment - Redevelopment action is the last alternative to 
urban renewal. It is undertaken only when neighborhoods have 
reached a point of decay whereby it would be unrealistic to try 
to repair or revive them. Generally, such neighborhoods have 
mostly substandard housing, poor street design and high incidence 
of both social and environmental blight factors. Treatment of 
such areas consists of acquiring and removing all substandard 
structures and replotting the area. The reuse of redevelopment 
areas may be for any type use or even any combination of uses 
that fits the city's land development plan. A program of 
clearance of blighted housing to be effective must provide for 
the relocation of the inhabitants in suitable standard housing. 
The Recommended Treatment Areas Map is presented in a general 
way. It should be followed up by more detailed surveys and 
analyses in these areas where problems are sorted out and in 
those areas recommended for redevelopment . 



104 



U* 



CANTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



600 1600 2400 320 
SCALE IN FEET 



MAP 14 

RECOMMENDED TREATMENT AREAS 



\Z3 CONSERVATION 
M REHABILITATION 
□ REDEVELOPMENT 





Concluding Remarks 




PART 8 






Concluding Remarks 

This report has focused its attention on blight. It has attempted to 
show that there is more than physical blight. Blight also expresses itself 
in social, mental and spiritual deterioration. These characteristics can be 
classified as human blight. Any program geared to the conservation, rehabili- 
tation or redevelopment of existing substandard units will have to be designed 
to counteract both physical and human blight at the same time. These two 
lines of attack are so interrelated that to concentrate on one without the 
other would be seriously deficient and doomed to failure. 

Any program to combat blight must be concerned with issues of human 
welfare, such as room for personal growth, economic opportunity and social 
participation. Canton must invest in the improvement of personal skills 
and resources, in developing the ability of people to earn a productive 
place in society and to provide for the aged and sick with respect. This 
investment can take many forms such as improved guidance and counseling of 
school dropouts, children with personal or family problems, unwed mothers, 
establishment of improved and expanded vocational training opportunities 
for adults and for those students not intending to go on to college and pro- 
viding planned activities for the aged. 

The availability of a skilled labor pool is a strong attractive force 
in bringing industry to an area. In relocation decisions, many industries 
today are beginning to place more emphasis on the quality of the local 
environment such as quality of the local school system, the availability of 
recreational opportunities and the quality of the local labor force. In the 
long run, investment by local communities in these areas will probably be 
more beneficial to the community than an over investment in capital, which 
has been the case in many communities that have attempted to lure industry. 

107 



Because of improved transportation, industries are less tied to specific 
locations and consequently the ''liveability" of an area becomes much more 
important in the location decision. It is important for Canton to realize 
this because without increased employment opportunities the town will loose 
its most productive citizens — the young educated segment. 

Three key issues in planning for comprehensive development are how best 
to interact with the larger problems of education, employment and systems 
of social institutions. These matters are especially difficult when these 
problems are acute and exhibit a tendency to perpetuate poverty and despair. 
While each of these has environmental aspects, the primary concentration 
must be in terms of program ingenuity, supporting legislation and financial 
aid. The focus, for example, in education is not the school plant, though 
it includes it. The focus is the program, the quality of the teaching and 
the ingenuity in reaching the children effectively and motivating them. 
The focus in employment is not the industrial area or transportation facili- 
ties, though it includes those as well. The focus is an advancing technology, 
consumption patterns, manpower development, trade or fiscal policies, and the 
elimination of discriminating practices. The focus on the system of social 
institutions is not the economically imbalanced community as much as it is 
the whole set of built-in attitudes which must be dealt with through politi- 
cal and social accommodations. Quality housing, good roads and better commu- 
nity facilities can be realized more effectively if we concentrate on assist- 
ing people and motivating people to help themselves. 



108 



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APPENDIX 
Environmental Considerations and Abstract 

This Neighborhood Analysis for Canton, North Carolina divides the Town 
into eight neighborhoods and the one-mile planning area into five neighbor- 
hoods for the purposes of study and comparison. Each neighborhood is described 
according to geographic boundaries and housing conditions. Social, economic 
and environmental conditions are studied for all neighborhoods within Canton. 
Conditions in the planning area are presented when data is readily available. 
In addition, each neighborhood is analyzed with respect to total blight and 
recommendations are made for the elimination or warding off of blight accord- 
ingly. 

I . Housing Conditions 

This study pinpoints areas of substandard (deteriorated and dilapi- 
dated) housing. Some of these houses are built on very steep slopes and 
other areas generally unsuited for residential development. The study 
recommends the demolition of all dilapidated housing when adequate relo- 
cation housing becomes available. This program would have a positive 
environmental effect in that it would provide for those now living in 
dilapidated housing a safer more decent place in which to live. This 
in turn would create a more positive attitude on the part of these indi- 
viduals by fostering a greater sense of pride in themselves, their homes 
and their community. In addition, the appearance of the landscape will 
be improved with the removal of these dilapidated houses. Several ade- 
quate sites exist in Canton and the planning area for relocation housing. 
The study also recommends fix-up campaigns on deteriorated housing and 
an active building code enforcement program. While incurring some expense 
on the part of individual home owners, this program would nevertheless 
prevent the spread of substandard housing. 

110 



I I . Economic Condi t ions 

The study recommends several programs to improve family incomes, 
including a better utilization of Haywood Technical Institute, especially 
for those who do not want or cannot afford to attend a four year college, 
an attempt to diversify the local economy by attracting good paying pol- 
lution free industry and encouraging the employment of the handicapped. 
Unless proper controls are placed on any new industry locating in Canton, 
odor, noise and other types of pollution will increase for the whole com- 
munity. While these controls might in a few cases discourage industry 
from locating in Canton, this is a small price to pay for creating a 
healthy environment. 
Ill . Environmental Conditions 

This study examines various unhealthy environmental conditions 
including fire occurrences, vehicle and pedestrian accidents, unpaved 
streets, inadequate recreation and school facilities, heavy traffic 
volumes, overcrowding within dwelling units and plumbing deficiencies. 
By pinpointing where these conditions occur most often will enable the 
Town to organize expenditures and programs to eliminate or reduce these 
unhealthy conditions. Attacking these problems would create additional 
financial commitments from the Town but would be worth the expenditure 
in that Canton would become a safer, healthier, more wholesome place in 
which to live. 

I V . Social Conditions 

The following social conditions were studied: stillbirths and 
infant mortality, tuberculosis, illigitimate births, adult crimes against 
persons and property, juvenile delinquency, public welfare, school drop- 
outs and venereal disease. These conditions create both personal and 

111 



/ 



public problems but can only be solved through a personal rehabilitation. 
The study recommends a program of education and counseling in order to 
encourage those people afflicted with these unhealhy conditions to help 
themselves. Only positive effects would be the result. 
V. General 

A more general program of cleaning up littered areas and vacant lots, 
improving visability at intersections, removing junk automobiles and 
appliances and landscaping the banks of the Pigeon River among other areas 
has been recommended in this study. Any programs aimed at these problems, 
while requiring certain financial obligations from the local government, 
will, nevertheless, move Canton in the direction of a more wholesome envir- 
onment for the entire community. 



112 



STATE LIBRARY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



3 3091 00748 3308